Regine O. Jackson, PH.D.

Morehouse College

Humanities, Social Sciences, Media, and Arts Division Faculty
  • Professor
  • Dean, Humanities, Social Sciences, Media, and Arts Division
Education
Dr. Regine Jackson is a professor of sociology and dean of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Media, and Arts Division at Morehouse College. 

She has received grants and awards from the American Sociological Association, Social Science Research Council, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Ford Foundation, Spencer Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.  Prior to coming to Morehouse, she served as Assistant Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Initiatives at Agnes Scott College. She also has had faculty leadership roles at Agnes Scott, including Sociology & Anthropology Department Chair, Faculty Coordinator of Global Learning, co-chairing a pandemic instructional planning task force, participating in a college-wide strategic planning committee, serving as an officer on the Faculty Executive Committee, and chairing the Campus Life Committee, as well as leadership appointments at Emory University.

With an undergraduate degree from Brown University and M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, Dr. Jackson continues to be an active scholar in the areas of Haitian migration and diaspora, race and ethnicity, American immigration, spatial inequality, and global learning. Her work includes a book, Geographies of the Haitian Diaspora, with another on the way (Boston Haitians: Navigating Race, Place, and Belonging in a Majority-Minority City) under contract and numerous solo- and co-authored publications in journals and books. Dr. Jackson’s research is complemented by public scholarship, commentary, faculty development workshops and invited presentations that place her in high demand as a speaker.

Contact:

Email
regine.jackson@morehouse.edu

Office Location
Wheeler Hall 203

Phone
470-639-6412

Office Hours
Fridays 12 pm – 2 pm

Publications

Books:

  • Black Lives: Race and Space in Two American Cities (Manuscript proposal)
  • Boston Haitians: Navigating Race, Place, and Belonging in a Majority-Minority City (Under contract).
  • Geographies of the Haitian Diaspora (New York and London: Routledge, 2011). (Edited volume)
    Reviewed by:
    Carolyn Cooper, Journal of Haitian Studies 19.1 (2013): 290 – 293.
    Bertin M. Louis, Jr., Transforming Anthropology 21.2 (2013): 198 – 199.
    Regine O. Jackson

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

Sole author:

  • “‘Ma Mere Raconte’: Haitian Women, History and Black Internationalism” (In progress).
  • “Atlanta’s Caribbean Carnival as Cultural and Spatial Practice” Contexts 21.2 (2022): 57 -59. 
  • “The Failure of Categories: Haitians in the United Nations Organization in the Congo, 1960 -1964” Journal of Haitian Studies 20.1 (2014): 34 – 64.
  • “Imagining Boston: Haitian Immigrants and Place in Zadie Smith’s On Beauty” Journal of American Studies 46.4 (2012): 855 – 873.
  • “Black Immigrants and the Rhetoric of Social Distancing” Sociology Compass 4.3 (2010): 193 –206.
  • “After the Exodus: The New Catholics in Boston’s Old Ethnic Neighborhoods” Religion andAmerican Culture 17.2 (Summer 2007): 191 – 212.


Co-author

  • Regine O. Jackson, Darrick Hamilton and William A. Darity, Jr., “When Makin’ It is Not Enough: Low Wealth and Economic Insecurity among Middle Class Blacks in Boston” (Under Review).
  • Gundolf Graml and Regine O. Jackson, “It Starts with a Journey: Global Learning as a Holistic, Interdisciplinary Curricular and Co-curricular Framework at a Liberal Arts College” Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice 21.5 (2021): 186 – 195.
  • Tatjana Meschede, Darrick Hamilton, Ana Patricia Muñoz, Regine O. Jackson, and William Darity Jr., “Inequality in the ‘Cradle of Liberty’: Race/Ethnicity and Wealth in Greater Boston” Race and Social Problems 8.1 (2016): 18 – 28.
  • Regine O. Jackson, Kathryn A. Sweeney and Adria N. Welcher, “‘It Just Happens’: Colorblind Ideology and Undergraduate Explanations for Lack of Interaction across Race Lines” Education, Citizenship and Social Justice 9.3 (2014): 91 – 208.


Book Chapters

  • “Decolonizing the Curriculum: Interdisciplinary Workshopping for Liberal Arts Faculty to Overcome Inertia” with Tracey E. Laird (In progress).
  • Darrick Hamilton and Regine O. Jackson, “An Asset-Poor Black American Middle Class: The Iterative Role of Hard Work, Education, and Intergenerational Poverty” in Christian Suter, S. Madheswaran and B. P. Vani, eds., The Middle Class in World Society: Negotiations, Diversities and Lived Experiences (London: Routledge, 2020): 201 – 218.
  • “The Uses of Diaspora among Haitians in Boston” in R. Jackson, ed. Geographies of the Haitian Diaspora (New York: Routledge, 2011): 135 – 162.
  • “The Shifting Nature of Racism” in Cameron D. Lippard and Charles A. Gallagher, eds. Being Brown in Dixie: Race, Ethnicity, and Latino Immigration in the New South (Boulder, CO: First Forum Press, 2010): 25 – 51.
  • “Beyond Social Distancing: Intermarriage and Ethnic Boundaries among Black Americans in Boston” in Y. Shaw-Taylor and S.A. Tuch, eds. The Other African Americans: Contemporary African and Caribbean Immigrants in the United States (Lanham, MD: Rowman &Littlefield, 2007): 217 – 254.


Book Reviews:

  • “A Place in the Sun: Haiti, Haitians and the Remaking of Quebec” The Journal of Haitian Studies 25.1 (2019): 238 -242.
  • “Crossing the Water and Keeping the Faith” Contemporary Sociology 44.6 (2015): 839 -841.
  • “Caribbean Migration to Western Europe and the United States” Contemporary Sociology 39.4 (2010): 428 – 30.
  • “The Other Black Bostonians: West Indians in Boston, 1900-1950” Wadabagei 11.3 (2008): 156– 60.
  • “Haitians and African-Americans: A Legacy of Tragedy and Hope” Wadabagei 6.2 (Summer/Fall 2003): 188 – 92.
  • “The Crisis of Geography in Georges Woke up Laughing” The Journal of Haitian Studies 9.1 (Spring 2003): 163 – 66.


Research reports:

  • Tatjana Meschede, Darrick Hamilton, Ana Patricia Muñoz, Regine O. Jackson, and William Darity Jr., (2016) “Wealth Inequalities in Greater Boston: Do Race and Ethnicity Matter?”
    Community Development Discussion Paper No. 2 Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. http://www.bostonfed.org/commdev/pcadp/2016/cddp1602.pdf
  • Ana Patricia Muñoz, Marlene Kim, Mariko Chang, Regine O. Jackson, Darrick Hamilton, William A. Darity, Jr. (2015) “The Color of Wealth in Boston” (A joint publication of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Duke University and The New School)
    http://www.bostonfed.org/commdev/color-of-wealth/color-of-wealth.pdf
  • Regine O. Jackson, Darrick Hamilton and William A. Darity, Jr. (2015) “Low Wealth and Economic Insecurity among Middle Class Blacks in Boston” Community Development Issue Brief No. 3. Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    http://www.bostonfed.org/commdev/issue-briefs/2015/cdbrief32015.htm

Awards and Honors

  • Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award (2021)
  • NFSA Senator Paul Simon Spotlight Award for Campus Internationalization (2020)
  • Institute of International Education Andrew Heiskell Award for Scholars as Drivers of Innovation(2019)
  • President’s Award for Social Justice — Mellon Foundation/ Agnes Scott College (2020)
  • Kathy ’68 and Lawrence Ashe Professorship – Agnes Scott College (2018)
  • Space, Place and the Humanities Summer Institute Award – National Endowment for the Humanities (2017)
  • Scholars in Residence Award – Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (2012)
  • Center for Faculty Development & Excellence Book Manuscript Conference Award – Emory University for “Local Strategies of Belonging” (2010)
  • Open Society Visiting Scholar Fellowship – Vilnius University, Lithuania (Fall 2004)
  • W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African-American Research Residential Fellowship –Harvard University (Fall 2003)
  • Salzburg Seminar in American Studies Fellowship – Salzburg, Austria: “Migration, Race and Ethnicity in Europe” (2003)
  • Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship – National Research Council (2002-2003)
  • Arts & Sciences Faculty Summer Research Fellowship – University of Richmond (2002)
  • Dissertation Fellowship – University of Michigan, Center for African & Afro-American Studies (1999)
  • Henry A. Murray Dissertation Award – Murray Research Center, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study (1998)
  • Summer Fellowship – Social Science Research Council, International Migration Program (1997)
  • ICPSR Summer Institute Award – University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research (1995, 1994)
  • Horace C. Rackham Merit Fellowship – University of Michigan (1993)
  • Samuel C. Lamport Award – Brown University, Department of Sociology (1993)

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